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Guns2018-05-18T18:25:25+00:00

Halloween Special: Expires Oct. 31

Halloween Special: Expires Oct. 31

Our Available Guns

Sub-Machine Guns
Machine Guns
Belt-Fed Machine Guns
.50 Cal Weapons
Specialty Weapons
Handguns

Sub-Machine Guns

HK MP-5K
The MP-5K compact submachine gun (K stands for “Kurz” in German, that means “short”) had been developed by the German company Heckler-Koch for various counter-terror and security units, that needed a short-range weapon with serious firepower. The HK MP-5K can be easily concealed under the clothes, in the glove compartment of a car, or in the special carry/fire suitcase. It also allows the high mobility in the confined spaces and in the crowd. MP-5K is widely used by various Law Enforcement and VIP protection units worldwide.
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Sten gun
The STEN (or Sten gun) was a family of British 9 mm submachine guns used extensively by British and Commonwealth forces throughout World War II and the Korean War. They were notable for having a simple design and very low production cost making them effective insurgency weapons for resistance groups. STEN is an acronym, from the names of the weapon’s chief designers, Major Reginald V. Shepherd and Harold Turpin, and EN for Enfield.[1] Over 4 million Stens in various versions were made in the 1940s.
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Uzi
The Uzi is a family of Israeli open-bolt, blowback-operated submachine guns. Smaller variants are considered to be machine pistols. The Uzi was one of the first weapons to use a telescoping bolt design which allows the magazine to be housed in the pistol grip for a shorter weapon.

The first Uzi submachine gun was designed by Major Uziel Gal in the late 1940s. The prototype was finished in 1950. First introduced to IDF special forces in 1954, the weapon was placed into general issue two years later. The Uzi has found use as a personal defense weapon by rear-echelon troops, officers, artillery troops, and tankers, as well as a frontline weapon by elite light infantry assault forces.

The Uzi has been exported to over 90 countries. Over its service lifetime, it has been manufactured by Israel Military Industries, FN Herstal, and other manufacturers. From the 1960s through the 1980s, more Uzi submachine guns were sold to more military and police markets than any other submachine gun ever made.

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mini UZI
The Mini-Uzi is a smaller version of the regular Uzi, first introduced in 1980. The Mini-Uzi is 600 mm (23.62 inches) long or 360 mm (14.17 inches) long with the stock folded. Its barrel length is 197 mm (7.76 inches), its muzzle velocity is 375 m/s (1230 f/s) and its effective range is 100 m. It has a greater automatic rate of fire of 950 rounds per minute due to the shorter bolt. Its weight is approximately 2.7 kg (6.0 lb)
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MP59 2

The Heckler & Koch MP5 (from German: Maschinenpistole 5, meaning Submachine 5) is a 9mm submachine gun of German design, developed in the 1960s by a team of engineers from the German small arms manufacturer Heckler & Koch GmbH (H&K) of Oberndorf am Neckar. There are over 100 variants of the MP5, including some semi-automatic versions.

The MP5 is one of the most widely used submachine guns in the world, having been adopted by 40 nations and numerous military, law enforcement, intelligence, and security organizations. It is widely used by SWAT teams in North America.

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AR 9mm

Details coming soon

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HK UMP
The Heckler & Koch UMP (Universale Maschinenpistole, German for “Universal Submachine Gun”) is a submachine gun developed and manufactured by Heckler & Koch. The UMP has been adopted by various agencies such as the U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Heckler & Koch developed the UMP as a lighter and cheaper successor to the MP5, though both remain in production.
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fn-p90 submachine gun
The FN P90, also known as the FN Project 1990, is a personal defense weapon (PDW) designed and manufactured by FN Herstal in Belgium. Created in response to NATO requests for a replacement for 9×19mm Parabellum firearms, the P90 was designed as a compact but powerful firearm for vehicle crews, operators of crew-served weapons, support personnel, special forces, and counter-terrorist groups.

Designed in conjunction with the FN Five-seven pistol and FN 5.7×28mm ammunition, development of the weapon began in 1986, and production commenced in 1990 (from which the “90” in its name is derived), whereupon the 5.7×28mm ammunition was redesigned and shortened. A modified version of the P90 with a magazine adapted to use the new ammunition was introduced in 1993, and the Five-seven pistol was subsequently introduced as a companion weapon using the same 5.7×28mm ammunition.

Featuring a compact bullpup design with an integrated reflex sight and fully ambidextrous controls, the P90 is an unconventional weapon with a futuristic appearance. Its design incorporates several innovations such as a unique top-mounted magazine and FN’s small-caliber, high-velocity 5.7×28mm ammunition.

The P90 is currently in service with military and police forces in over 40 nations, such as Austria, Brazil, Canada, France, Greece, India, Malaysia, Poland, and the United States. In the United States, the P90 is in use with over 200 law enforcement agencies, including the U.S. Secret Service. While developed and initially marketed as a PDW, it can also be considered a submachine gun or compact assault rifle. The standard selective fire P90 is restricted to military and law enforcement customers, but since 2005, a semi-automatic version has been offered to civilian shooters as the PS90.

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Tommy Guns Bullets and Burgers

The Thompson submachine gun is an American submachine gun, invented by John T. Thompson in 1918, that became infamous during the Prohibition era, becoming a signature weapon of various organized crime syndicates in the United States. It was a common sight in the media of the time, being used by both law enforcement officers and criminals. The Thompson submachine gun was also known informally as the “Tommy Gun”, “Annihilator”, “Chicago Typewriter”, “Chicago Piano”, “Chicago Style”, “Chicago Organ Grinder”, “Trench Broom”, “Trench Sweeper”, “The Chopper”, and simply “The Thompson”.

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Sig Sauer MPX

The SIG MPX is a gas-operated submachine gun designed and manufactured by SIG Sauer, and is primarily chambered in 9×19mm Parabellum cartridge. It is the first submachine gun to feature a fully closed and rotating bolt and piston system. This was done to enhance the safety of the user and to have a more reliable firearm. It was designed in 2013 and was released to the general public in 2015. It features the SIG Sauer short stroke pushrod gas system to reduce the recoil and improve the reliability of the weapon.

The MPX, in its second generation, features a system that would allow for conversion from 9mm to .357 SIG or .40 S&W, however, since its inception, first party conversion kits have not been made available for either of the two production generations of the submachine gun.

SIG Sauer also used the same gas piston system to develop the SIG Sauer MCX carbine.

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Sterling

The Sterling submachine gun is a British submachine gun. It was tested with the British Army in 1944–1945 as a replacement for the Sten but it did not start to replace it until 1953. It remained in use until 1994, when it was phased out as the L85A1 assault rifle was phased in.

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PPSh-41

The PPSh-41 (pistolet-pulemyot Shpagina; Russian: Пистолет-пулемёт Шпагина; “Shpagin machine pistol”); is a Soviet submachine gun designed by Georgy Shpagin as a cheap, reliable, and simplified alternative to the PPD-40. Common nicknames are “pe-pe-sha” (Russian: ППШ) from its three-letter prefix and “papasha” (Russian: папаша), meaning “daddy”.

The PPSh is a magazine-fed selective fire submachine gun using an open bolt, blowback action. Made largely of stamped steel, it can be loaded with either a box or drum magazine and fires the 7.62×25mm Tokarev pistol round.

The PPSh saw extensive combat use during World War II and the Korean War. It was one of the major infantry weapons of the Soviet Armed Forces during World War II. Around six million PPSh-41s were manufactured. In the form of the Chinese Type 50 (licensed copy), it was still being used by the Viet Cong as late as 1970. According to the 2002 edition of the Encyclopedia of Weapons of World War II, the PPSh was still in use with irregular militaries.

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Machine Guns

H&K G36

Created for the requirements of the German armed forces, the G36 continues to set the standard in the field of assault rifles. Used as an infantry weapon in a large number of countries, special forces and security forces also rely on its constant reliability.

Essential components of the G36 are made of glass fiber reinforced plastic. This gives the user a lightweight weapon with high performance and low maintenance requirements. The G36 is ideally suited for dismounted infantry operations. For optimal handling, weight, and rate of fire in close-quarters battle, and for rapid, accurate and penetrating single fire in long-range combat.

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G36c 1
The dimensions of a submachine gun with the terminal ballistics of the 5.56 mm NATO round. Developed for special tactical applications by police and military special forces.
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G36K
Enhanced mobility. The compact version for the unit’s specialists. Extremely efficient, with all of the capabilities of an assault rifle at short and medium ranges. Optimally suited for use in cramped areas.
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HK33
The HK33 is a 5.56mm assault rifle developed in the 1960s by West German armament manufacturer Heckler & Koch GmbH (H&K), primarily for export.

Capitalizing on the success of their G3 design, the company developed a family of small arms (all using the G3 operating principle and basic design concept) consisting of four types of firearms: the first type, chambered in 7.62×51mm NATO, the second—using the Soviet 7.62×39mm M43 round, third—the intermediate 5.56×45mm calibre and the fourth type—chambered for the 9×19mm Parabellum pistol cartridge.

The HK33 series of rifles were adopted by the Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira or FAB), the armed forces of Thailand and Malaysia where they were produced under a license agreement. The rifle was also license-built in Turkey by MKEK, and exported from France branded as MAS but actually made in Germany.

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HK53
The compact version of the HK33K. Has a short, 211 mm barrel, a forearm derived from the MP5 submachine gun and a telescopic shoulder stock or receiver endplate cover (later models also received a four-prong flash hider).
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HK93
The Heckler and Koch HK93 is a semi-automatic civilian sporting rifle based upon the .223 Remington Heckler & Koch HK33 assault rifle and is the follow-up to the HK43 rifle.  It is Will Teasle’s primary weapon in Rambo, First Blood. Much like US Navy SEALs in Vietnam, he prefers this weapon over the M16s the rest of his men use.
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L1A1 British
The L1A1 Self-Loading Rifle, also known as the SLR (Self-Loading Rifle), by the Canadian Army designation C1A1 or in the US as the “inch pattern” FAL., is a British version of the Belgian FN FAL battle rifle (Fusil Automatique Léger [“Light Automatic Rifle”] produced by the Belgian armaments manufacturer Fabrique Nationale de Herstal ). The L1A1 is produced under license and has seen use in the Australian Army, Canadian Army, Indian Army, Jamaica Defence Force, Malaysian Army, New Zealand Army, Rhodesian Army, South African Defence Force and the British Armed Forces.

The original FAL was designed in Belgium using metric dimensions, while the components of the “inch-pattern” FALs are manufactured to a slightly modified design using British imperial units. Many sub-assemblies are interchangeable between the two types, while components of those sub-assemblies may not be compatible. Notable incompatibilities include the magazines and the butt-stock, which attach in different ways.

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M4L1
The M4 is a shortened variant of the M16A2 rifle, it has a 14.5-inch barrel, allowing its user to better operate in close quarters combat. The M4 carbine is heavily used by the U.S military. It is slated to eventually replace the M16 rifle for most combat units in the United States Army.
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COLT M16
The M16 rifle, officially designated Rifle, Caliber 5.56 mm, M16, is the United States military version of the AR-15 rifle. The rifle was adapted for semi-automatic, three-round burst, and full-automatic fire. The M16 fires the 5.56×45mm NATO cartridge. The rifle entered United States Army service and was deployed for jungle warfare operations in South Vietnam in 1963, becoming the U.S. military’s standard service rifle of the Vietnam War by 1969, replacing the M14 rifle in that role. Since the Vietnam War, the M16 rifle family has been the primary service rifle of the U.S. armed forces and has also been widely adopted by other militaries around the world. In 2010, the M16 began to be phased out in the U.S. Army and is being supplemented by the M4 carbine, which is itself a shortened derivative of the M16A2.
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Scar 16
Chambered for the high-velocity 5.56x45mm NATO/.223 Remington cartridge, the selective fire FN SCAR® 16’s innovative gas-operated, short-stroke piston system reduces fouling for greater reliability. The FN SCAR® 16 system features three user-interchangeable, free-floating, cold hammer-forged MIL-SPEC barrels with hard-chromed bores and three-prong flash suppressors. Fully ambidextrous operating controls instantly adapt the FN SCAR® 16 to any user. The receiver-integrated MIL-STD-1913 optical rail plus three accessory rails enable mounting of a wide variety of tactical lights and lasers. The side-folding polymer stock is fully adjustable for comb height and length of pull and is colored authentic Flat Dark Earth (FDE).
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AK-47
The AK-47 is a selective-fire, gas-operated 7.62×39mm assault rifle, first developed in the USSR by Mikhail Kalashnikov. Even after six decades the model and its variants remain the most widely used and popular assault rifles in the world because of their durability, low production cost, and ease of use. It has been manufactured in many countries and has seen service with armed forces as well as irregular forces worldwide.
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AK-47 Krink

In the United States, the AKS-74U is called a “Krinkov”. The origin of this term is uncertain. A hypothesis was circulating that the name came from the mujahadeen who supposedly had captured a high-ranking Soviet officer armed with an AKS-74U, and that they had named it after him. However, an investigation by Patrick Sweeney could not confirm this hypothesis, for no Soviet officer with a resembling name was captured in Afghanistan. US journalist C. J. Chivers reported that the gun was nicknamed “the Osama” in jihadist circles after Osama bin Laden was photographed next to an AKS-74U. Research by The Firearm Blog published in 2016 suggests that the name “Krinkov” is actually a Pashtun invention that came to the United States with accounts of the Mujahideen.

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AK-74
The AK-74 (Russian: Автомат Калашникова образца 1974 года or “Kalashnikov automatic rifle model 1974”) is an assault rifle developed in the early 1970s by Russian designer Mikhail Kalashnikov as the replacement for the earlier AKM (itself a refined version of the AK-47). It uses a smaller 5.45×39mm cartridge, replacing the 7.62×39mm chambering of earlier Kalashnikov-pattern weapons.

The rifle first saw service with Soviet forces engaged in the 1979 Afghanistan conflict. The head of the Afghan bureau of the Pakistani Inter-Services Intelligence claimed that the CIA paid $5,000 for the first AK-74 captured by the mujahadeen during the Soviet-Afghan War.

Presently, the rifle continues to be used by the majority of countries of the former USSR. Additionally, licensed copies were produced in Bulgaria (AK-74, AKS-74, and AKS-74U), and former East Germany (MPi-AK-74N, MPi-AKS-74N, MPi-AKS-74NK). Besides former Soviet republics and eastern European countries, Mongolia, North Korean Special Forces, and Vietnamese People’s Naval infantry use AK-74s.

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FN FAL
The Fusil Automatique Léger (“Light Automatic Rifle”) or FAL is a self-loading, selective fire battle rifle produced by the Belgian armaments manufacturer Fabrique Nationale de Herstal (FN). During the Cold War, it was adopted by many North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries, with the notable exception of the United States. It is one of the most widely used rifles in history, having been used by over 90 countries.

The FAL was predominantly chambered for the 7.62×51mm NATO round, and because of its prevalence and widespread use among the armed forces of many NATO countries during the Cold War it was nicknamed “The right arm of the Free World”.

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G3
The Heckler & Koch G3 is a 7.62×51mm NATO, select-fire battle rifle developed in the 1950s by the German armament manufacturer Heckler & Koch (H&K) in collaboration with the Spanish state-owned design and development agency CETME (Centro de Estudios Técnicos de Materiales Especiales).
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Belt-Fed Machine Guns

M249 SAW
The M249 light machine gun (LMG), previously designated the M249 Squad Automatic Weapon (SAW), and formally written as Light Machine Gun, 5.56 mm, M249 is an American version of the Belgian FN Minimi. The M249 is manufactured in the United States and is widely used by the U.S. Armed Forces. The M249 provides infantry squads with the heavy volume of fire of a machine gun combined with accuracy and portability approaching that of a rifle.
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PKM
The PKM is a 7.62 mm general-purpose machine gun designed in the Soviet Union and currently in production in Russia. The PK machine gun was introduced in the 1960s and replaced the SGM and RPD machine guns in Soviet service. It remains in use as a front-line infantry and vehicle-mounted weapon with Russia’s armed forces.
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M60

The M60, officially the United States Machine Gun, Caliber 7.62 mm, M60, is a family of American general-purpose machine guns firing 7.62×51mm NATO cartridges from a disintegrating belt of M13 links. There are several types of ammunition approved for use in the M60, including ball, tracer, and armor-piercing rounds. Introduced in 1957, it has served with every branch of the U.S. military and still serves with the armed forces of other states. Its manufacture and continued upgrade for military and commercial purchase continue into the 21st century, although it has been replaced or supplemented in most roles by other designs, most notably the M240 machine gun in U.S. service.

An M60 machine gun is the major weapon used by John Rambo (Sylvester Stallone) in the film First Blood.

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M1919
The M1919 Browning is a .30 caliber medium machine gun that was widely used during the 20th century, especially during World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. The M1919 saw service as a light infantry, coaxial, mounted, aircraft, and anti-aircraft machine gun by the U.S. and many other countries. Many M1919s were rechambered for the new 7.62×51mm NATO round and remain in service to this day.

The M1919 was an air-cooled development of the standard US machine gun of World War I, the John M. Browning-designed water-cooled M1917. The emergence of general-purpose machine guns in the 1950s pushed the M1919 into secondary roles in many cases, especially after the arrival of the M60 in US Army service. The United States Navy also converted many to 7.62mm NATO, and designated them Mk 21 Mod 0; they were commonly used on river craft in the 1960s and 1970s in Vietnam. Many NATO countries also converted their examples to 7.62, and these remained in service well into the 1990s, as well as up to the present day in some countries.

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RPD
The RPD (Russian: ручной пулемёт Дегтярёва Ruchnoy Pulemyot Degtyaryova, English: Degtyaryov hand-held machine gun) is a 7.62mm light machine gun developed in the Soviet Union by Vasily Degtyaryov for the 7.62×39mm M43 intermediate cartridge. It was created as a replacement for the DP machine gun chambered for the 7.62×54mmR round. It is a precursor of most squad automatic weapons. It was succeeded in Soviet service by the RPK.
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PKM
The PK (Russian: Пулемёт Калашникова, transliterated as Pulemyot Kalashnikova, or “Kalashnikov’s Machinegun”), is a 7.62x54mmR general-purpose machine gun designed in the Soviet Union and currently in production in Russia. The original PK machine gun was introduced in 1961 and then the improved PKM in 1969 to replace the SGM and RP-46 machine guns in Soviet service. It remains in use as a front-line infantry and vehicle-mounted weapon with Russia’s armed forces. The PK has been exported extensively and produced in several other countries under license.
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UK vz.59 machine gun

The Universal Machine Gun Model 1959 (Czech: Univerzální kulomet vzor 59) is a general-purpose machine gun developed in Czechoslovakia in the 1950s. It remains in use by the Czech Army and the Slovak Armed Forces.

The Uk vz. 59 fires 7.62×54mmR ammunition (although a Vz. 59N variant for 7.62×51mm NATO ammunition also exists), delivered via an ammunition belt. The weapon can serve as a light (light barrel and bipod, vz. 59L model) and medium machine gun (heavy barrel and tripod), and can also be used as a co-axial mounted weapon (Vz. 59T version).

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The M240, officially the Machine Gun, 7.62 mm, M240, is the US military designation for the FN MAG (French: Mitrailleuse d’Appui Général, English: general-purpose machine gun), a family of belt-fed, gas-operated medium machine guns that chamber the 7.62×51mm NATO cartridge.

The M240 has been used by the United States Armed Forces since the late 1970s. It is used extensively by infantry, most often in rifle companies, as well as on ground vehicles, watercraft, and aircraft. Despite being heavier than some comparable weapons, it is highly regarded for reliability and its standardization among NATO members is a major advantage.

All variants are fed from disintegrating belts, and are capable of firing most types of 7.62 mm (.308 in) NATO ammunition. M240 variants can be converted to use non-disintegrating belts. There are significant differences in weight and some features among some versions which restrict interchangeability of parts. The M240s used by the US military are currently manufactured by FN America, the American subsidiary of FN Herstal.

The M240B and M240G are usually fired from an integrated bipod, a tripod, or a vehicular mount; regarding tripod use, the U.S. Army primarily uses the M192 Lightweight Ground Mount, while the U.S. Marine Corps uses the M122A1 tripod, a slightly updated M2 tripod.

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.50 Cal Weapons

Barrett M82 A1 .50 Cal Sniper Rifle
The M107 is a recoil-operated, semi-automatic anti-materiel rifle developed by the American Barrett Firearms Manufacturing company. A heavy SASR (Special Application Scoped Rifle), it is used by many units and armies around the world. It is also called the “Light Fifty” for its .50 caliber BMG (12.7 × 99 mm) chambering.
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Desert Eagle .50 Cal
The Israel Military Industries Desert Eagle is a large-framed gas-operated semi-automatic pistol designed by Magnum Research in the US. The handgun is fed with a detachable magazine. Magazine capacity is 9 rounds in .357 Magnum, 8 rounds in .44 Magnum, and 7 rounds in .50 Action Express. The Desert Eagle’s barrel features polygonal rifling. The pistol is primarily used for hunting, target shooting, and silhouette shooting. The Desert Eagle has been featured in more than 500 motion pictures, television shows, and video games.
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Desert Eagle .50 Cal GOLD
Same details as the standard Desert Eagle, except its GOLD! The Israel Military Industries Desert Eagle is a large-framed gas-operated semi-automatic pistol designed by Magnum Research in the US. The handgun is fed with a detachable magazine. Magazine capacity is 9 rounds in .357 Magnum, 8 rounds in .44 Magnum, and 7 rounds in .50 Action Express. The Desert Eagle’s barrel features polygonal rifling. The pistol is primarily used for hunting, target shooting, and silhouette shooting. The Desert Eagle has been featured in more than 500 motion pictures, television shows, and video games.
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M2 Browning "Deuce"
The M2 Machine Gun or Browning .50 Caliber Machine Gun is a heavy machine gun designed toward the end of World War I by John Browning. Its design is similar to Browning’s earlier M1919 Browning machine gun, which was chambered for the .30-06 cartridge. The M2 uses the much larger and much more powerful .50 BMG cartridge, which was developed alongside and takes its name from the gun itself (BMG standing for Browning Machine Gun). It has been referred to as “Ma Deuce”, in reference to its M2 nomenclature. The design has had many specific designations; the official designation for the current infantry type is Browning Machine Gun, Cal. .50, M2, HB, Flexible. It is effective against infantry, unarmored or lightly armored vehicles and boats, light fortifications and low-flying aircraft. The M2 has been produced longer than any other machine gun.
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BARRETT M107A1 RIFLE

Utilizing state of the art design, manufacturing, and materials, every component of the rifle has been engineered to be lighter and stronger than its predecessors. In addition to a 4-pound weight reduction, the M107A1 is optimized for use with a sound suppressor, providing a much-needed signature reduction capability to the warfighter. Lighter, stronger, more accurate, and more capable; the M107A1 has truly been engineered for action.

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S&W MODEL 500 .50 MAGNUM

In 2003 the gunsmiths and engineers at Smith & Wesson wanted to deliver maximum power for serious handgun hunters. The power they sought required an entirely new frame, the massive “X-Frame™,” and was the basis for the new Model S&W500™, the most powerful production revolver in the world.  This ushered in the era of the “big gun” and was only the beginning.   For ultimate power and velocity, there’s nothing even close to an X-Frame model handgun.

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Specialty Weapons

Smith & Wesson Model 60 .357 Magnum

The Model 60 is a 5 shot DA/SA stainless steel “J” frame revolver.  It features a 2 ¼ inch underlug barrel and exposed hammer.  The grips are black synthetic material that wears well.  It also has a front blade sight and fixed rear sight.  The Model 60 is an excellent concealed carry revolver if you want a lot of firepower in a small package.

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Remington 870 Shotgun
The Remington Model 870 is a pump-action shotgun manufactured by Remington Arms Company, LLC. It is widely used by the public for sports shooting, hunting, and self-defense and used by law enforcement and military organizations worldwide.
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S&W MODEL 500 .50 MAGNUM

In 2003 the gunsmiths and engineers at Smith & Wesson wanted to deliver maximum power for serious handgun hunters. The power they sought required an entirely new frame, the massive “X-Frame™,” and was the basis for the new Model S&W500™, the most powerful production revolver in the world.  This ushered in the era of the “big gun” and was only the beginning.   For ultimate power and velocity, there’s nothing even close to an X-Frame model handgun.

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Lee Enfield Bolt Action
The Lee–Enfield is a bolt-action, magazine-fed, repeating rifle that served as the main firearm used by the military forces of the British Empire and Commonwealth during the first half of the 20th century. It was the British Army’s standard rifle from its official adoption in 1895 until 1957. The WWI versions are often referred to as the “SMLE,” which is short for the common “Short Magazine Lee-Enfield” variant, although that terminology was dropped by the British in 1926.
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Saiga 12

The Saiga-12 (/ˈsaɪɡə/) is a 12-gauge shotgun available in a wide range of configurations, patterned after the Kalashnikov series of rifles and named for the Saiga antelope. Like the Kalashnikov rifle variants, it is a rotating bolt, gas-operated gun that feeds from a box magazine. All Saiga-12 configurations are recognizable as Kalashnikov-pattern guns by the large lever-safety on the right side of the receiver, the optic mounting rail on the left side of the receiver and the large top-mounted dust cover held in place by the rear of the recoil spring assembly.

The Saiga-12 is manufactured by the arms division of Izhmash, in Russia. It was previously imported into the US by European American Armories, although their agreement expired in 2005 and Izhmash then began exporting through the Russian-American Armory Company. The current export import partner is Wolf Performance Arms. Izhmash also manufactures Saiga 20s and Saiga 410s in 20-gauge and .410 bore, as well as the Saiga semi-automatic hunting rifles in a number of centerfire calibers.

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Remington 700 .308
The Remington Model 700 is a series of bolt-action rifles manufactured by Remington Arms since 1962. All are based on the same centerfire bolt action. They often come with a 3-, 4- or 5-round internal magazine depending on caliber, some of which have a floor-plate for quick-unloading, and some of which are “blind” (with no floor-plate). The rifle can also be ordered with a detachable box magazine. The Model 700 is available in many different stock, barrel and caliber configurations. It is a development of the Remington 721 and 722 series of rifles, which were introduced in 1948.
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SW .44 Mag

Sometimes you have to ask yourself if you “feel lucky” before selecting your gun. One, in particular, a Smith & Wesson Model 29 revolver in .44 Magnum, was touted onscreen and in its film publicity as being the “most powerful handgun in the world.” In the early 1970s, it was a strong contender for that title in revolvers, although some single-shot pistols surpassed it at that time.

In 1971, a young San Francisco police inspector named Harry Callahan first appeared on the silver screen in Dirty Harry. We learned early on that Inspector Callahan got his nickname from not playing nice with criminals. While other police settled for .38 Special revolvers, the N-frame Model 29 Smith & Wesson was what Inspector #2211 carried, albeit loaded with light .44 Special cartridges.

The original movie script called for Dirty Harry to carry a nickel finish Model 29, but with a four-inch barrel. Early screen tests in different lighting and actor Clint Eastwood’s own test-firing of a Model 29 revolver led to the consideration of using longer barrels. Both an 8 3/8-inch and three 6 1/2-inch Model 29s were procured for filming. The longest barrel was to be primarily showcased in posters, where with special photography, that already long barrel was made to seem even more sizable.

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M203 GRENADE LAUNCHER
Pictured here mounted on an M4A1, the M203 is a single shot 40 mm grenade launcher designed to attach to a rifle. It uses the same rounds as the older stand-alone M79 break-action grenade launcher, which utilizes the High-Low Propulsion System to keep recoil forces low. Though versatile, and compatible with many rifle models, the M203 was originally designed for the U.S. M16 and its variant, the M4 Carbine.
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DRAGUNOV SVD
The Dragunov sniper rifle SVD (Snayperskaya Vintovka Dragunova, literally “Dragunov’s sniper rifle”) is a semi-automatic sniper rifle/designated marksman rifle chambered in 7.62×54mmR and developed in the Soviet Union. The Dragunov was designed as a squad support weapon since according to Soviet and Soviet-derived military doctrines the long-range engagement ability was lost to ordinary troops when submachine guns and assault rifles (which are optimized for close-range and medium-range, rapid-fire combat) were adopted. For that reason, it was originally named “Dragunov’s Semi-Automatic Rifle”. Since 1963 the Dragunov has become the standard squad support weapon of several countries, including those of the former Warsaw Pact.
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BROWNING .50 CAL
The M2 Machine Gun or Browning .50 Caliber Machine Gun is a heavy machine gun designed towards the end of World War I by John Browning. The M2 uses the .50 BMG cartridge, which was developed alongside and takes its name from the gun itself (BMG standing for Browning Machine Gun). The M2 has been referred to as “Ma Deuce”, or “the fifty” in reference to its caliber. It is effective against infantry, unarmored or lightly armored vehicles and boats, light fortifications and low-flying aircraft.

The Browning .50 caliber machine gun has been used extensively as a vehicle weapon and for aircraft armament by the United States from the 1920s to the present. It was heavily used during World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and during the Iraq War and War in Afghanistan in the 2000s and 2010s. It is the primary heavy machine gun of NATO countries and has been used by many other countries. The M2 has been in use longer than any other small arm in U.S. inventory except the .45 ACP M1911 pistol, also designed by John Browning.

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Handguns

Glock 17
The Glock pistol sometimes referred to by the manufacturer as Glock “Safe Action” Pistol, is a semi-automatic pistol designed and produced by Glock Ges.m.b.H., located in Deutsch-Wagram, Austria. Glock commands 65% of the market share of handguns for the United States law enforcement agencies as well as supplies numerous national armed forces and security agencies worldwide. The Glock 17 is the original 9×19mm Parabellum model, with a standard magazine capacity of 17 rounds. The Glock 17C was introduced in 1996 and incorporated slots cut in the barrel and slide to compensate for muzzle rise and recoil.
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Glock 19
The Glock 19 is effectively a reduced-size Glock 17, called the “Compact” by the manufacturer. It was first produced in 1988, primarily for military and law enforcement. The Glock 19’s barrel and pistol grip are shorter by about 12 mm (0.5 in) than the Glock 17, and it uses a magazine with a standard capacity of 15 rounds. The pistol is compatible with factory magazines from the Glock 17 and Glock 18, giving the Glock 19 available capacities of: 17 rounds (standard magazine with +2 extension), 10, 17, and 19 (standard Glock 17 magazine with +2), and the 31 (standard Glock 18 magazine with +2 removed) and 33 rounds of the Glock 18. To preserve the operational reliability of the short recoil system, the mass of the slide remains the same as in the Glock 17 from which it is derived. With the exception of the slide, frame, barrel, locking block, recoil spring, guide rod, and slide lock spring, all of the other components are interchangeable between the models 17 and 19.
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Glock 21
The Glock 21 is a .45 ACP version of the Glock 20 designed primarily for the American market. Compared to the Glock 20 chambered in 10mm Auto, the slide of the Glock 21 is lighter to compensate for the lower-energy .45 ACP cartridge. The standard Glock 21 magazine is of the single-position-feed, staggered-column type with a capacity of 13 rounds.
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Glock 24

The Glock 24 is a .40 S&W long-slide variant of the Glock 22, similar in concept to the Glock 17L. Additionally, a compensated, ported-barrel version designated the 24C was also produced. The Glock 24 was introduced in 1994 and officially dropped from the company’s regular product lineup upon the release of the Glock 34 and 35.

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Sig Sauer P226

The SIG Sauer P226 is a full-sized, service-type pistol made by SIG Sauer. It is chambered for the 9×19mm Parabellum, .40 S&W, .357 SIG, and .22 Long Rifle. It is essentially the same basic design of the SIG Sauer P220, but developed to use higher capacity, double stack magazines in place of the single stack magazines of the P220. The P226 itself has spawned further sub-variants; the P228 and P229 are both compact versions of the double stack P226 design. The SIG Sauer P226 and its variants are in service with numerous law enforcement and military organizations worldwide.

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S&W M&P
The Smith & Wesson M&P (Military and Police) is a polymer-framed, short recoil operated, locked breech semi-automatic pistol introduced in the summer of 2005 by the American company Smith & Wesson. It uses a Browning-type locking system. While targeted at law enforcement agencies, the M&P is also widely available on the commercial market.
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.44 MAGNUM

The .44 Remington Magnum, or simply .44 Magnum (10.9×33mmR), and frequently .44 Mag, is a large-bore cartridge originally designed for revolvers. After its introduction, it was quickly adopted for carbines and rifles. Despite the “.44” designation, guns chambered for the .44 Magnum round, and its parent, the .44 Special, use 0.429 in (10.9 mm) diameter bullets.

The .44 Magnum is based on a lengthened .44 Special case, loaded to higher pressures for greater velocity (and thus, energy). The .44 Magnum has since been eclipsed in power by the .454 Casull, and most recently by the .460 S&W Magnum and .500 S&W Magnum, among others; nevertheless, it has remained one of the most popular commercial large-bore magnum cartridges. When loaded to its maximum and with heavy, deeply penetrating bullets, the .44 Magnum cartridge is suitable for short-range hunting of all North American game—though at the cost of heavy recoil and muzzle flash when fired in handguns, less so in carbines and rifles.

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S&W MODEL 500 .50 MAGNUM

The Smith & Wesson Model 500 is a five-shot, single action/double-action large caliber revolver produced by Smith & Wesson, firing the .500 S&W Magnum cartridge, a .50 caliber bullet. It is the most powerful production revolver in the world today, and it is being marketed as being “the world’s most powerful handgun” by the manufacturer. The Model 500 is suitable for sport and hunting applications. The high energy of these rounds makes it possible to hunt extremely large African game successfully.

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